Aug 20 2019

#WEPFF #WEP #Poetry and #BoutofBooks 26 Day 2 Recap with Adaptations and Favorite #books

wepff aug 2019

HEARSE WHEELBARROW poem by @JLenniDorner

wep wepff feedback preference chart
FCA 26 words

(For anyone who doesn’t “get” poetry– those aren’t piles of snow. Many dead people covered by white blankets.)

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Bout of Books
Bout of Books 26

Today’s challenge:
Tuesday 8/20
Adaptation Aspirations

What book would you like to see adapted for another medium? What would be your preferred format? Movie? TV Show? Broadway musical? Something else? If you want to elaborate even further, who would you cast to play the characters? Who would you want to write the script/screenplay? Write the music? Direct? Are there adaptations that exist that you think could be better? Tell us all about your aspirations for the perfect adaptation!

Obviously, my first instinct is to pick Fractions of Existence. Why wouldn’t I pick my own book? Well, because you might want to hear about something else.

Strangely, Incredibly Good (Strangely, Incredibly Good Series Book 1) by Heather Grace Stewart

Cat: Rebel Wilson or B.K. Cannon
Gene: Jason Momoa
Bad Ass Gram: Ann Morgan Guilbert died, so I can’t pick her. Cloris Leachman
Directed by: Catherine Hardwicke
Soundtrack by The Foo Fighters and the Goo Goo Dolls
Screenplay by: Jeremy Leven



Instagram:
#bob26igphoto #boutofbooks Favorites



Day of the challenge: Day 2
What I read today:
The Phantom Forest by Liz Kerin



My GOALS during Bout of Books 26:

  1. Finish reading 3 books
  2. Take part in the challenges
  3. Write 3 book reviews
  4. Enjoy my birthday
  5. Find a book where the MC returns to hometown

25 comments

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  1. Love your poem.
    A dirty job – but someone has to do it, and your wheelbarrow is the perfect vehicle.

  2. Wow, when I first read your poem I did think of snow.
    Then I read your bit below, and saw your wheelbarrow in a whole new light. A sad light, but I agree with Elephants Child – it is the perfect vehicle for such a task.
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  3. I love how poetry is open to so many interpretations and visions.
    Nicely done – yours packs a punch in so few words.
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  4. I love the way you’ve put the post together and I admire you for having ‘write 3 book reviews’ as one of your goals, I think perhaps I should adopt this. Way to go!
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    • Pat Garcia on August 21, 2019 at 10:31 AM
    • Reply

    Hi,
    Sometimes wheelbarrows do all of what we call the dirty work. For me, your poem speaks of a sadness. Very well done.

    Shalom aleichem,
    Pat G
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  5. Thank you for including that explanatory note — which I needed to fully understand your evocative poem which, sadly, could fit in so many places in history.
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  6. What a sad little poem. So short and so evocative.
    About adaptations: I always wanted my novels to be adapted as Japanese anime. Not movies, nor plays, just manga. Call me weird. 🙂

  7. While I read, I envisioned the person who had the job of wheelbarrowing those poor, what seemed to me victims of a terrible killing spree. Sad, but highly vivid.
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  8. I’ve always marveled at people who are good at poetry. I enjoy writing it, but I’ve never felt confident about it. This poem painted some vivid images for me, and it was more than a little unsettling. Well done!
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  9. Hi J Lenni. You’ve packed a punch into 26 words. Hard to look at a wheelbarrow the same way ever again. Now I’m going to mourn the melt forever. Thanks for such an imaginative WEP entry.
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  10. Tragic – the lumps of snow. Quite chilling too.
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  11. Sometimes the wheelbarrow is the best tool for the job, even if the job is horrible. Great poem indeed.

  12. After reading your footnote, that poem just got scarier.
    (PS: Unfortunately I happen to be one of those who don’t get poetry.)

    PPS: To answer the ‘What book would you like to see adapted for another medium?’ question, I’d definitely recommend the ‘Book of Time’ trilogy by Guillaume Prevost. It would make a great movie.
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  13. Wow–powerful and melancholy. Interestingly, the WIP I’m currently working on is set at the beginning of the Black Death’s march across Europe. There were plenty of white-shrouded bodies to be had then.
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  14. I found your poem very emotional especially with the picture. Well done.

  15. Hi J Lenni – amazing … horrible – but I knew that direction … really well written – and I can so easily imagine … the blood red trails through the snow … dying or dead bodies being transported … very powerful … cheers Hilary

  16. Oh wow, that was a lot of imagery in such few words. A devastating event.

  17. Your footnote just made your poem scarier.

    PS: Unfortunately, I’m one of those who don’t get poetry.

    PPS: In answer to the question, “What book would you like to see adapted for another medium? What would be your preferred format?” I’d like to suggest the ‘Book of Time’ trilogy by Guillaume Prévost as a movie.
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  18. Your footnote just made your poem scarier.

    PS: Unfortunately, I’m one of those who don’t get poetry.

    PPS: In answer to the question, “What book would you like to see adapted for another medium? What would be your preferred format?” I’d like to suggest the ‘Book of Time’ trilogy by Guillaume Prévost as a movie.
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  19. Powerful poem! I had a feeling of sadness and that something awful had happened but didn’t understand fully until I read your comment underneath. “Mourn the melt forever” is a great line.
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  20. What a powerful visual image I had with your poem. Very touching!

  21. I imagined someone scooping and moving mounds of blood-spattered snow out of sight until I saw your note, so I guess I wasn’t too far off. Sad, but honest. Well-written and powerful.
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  22. Powerful – especially after reading your note for us non-poetry types. But, I’ve read enough to feel the emotions.
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  23. It’s been a while since I’ve done a Bout of Books, but looks like you’re having fun! Thanks for stopping by and I hope you get lots of good reading in this week!
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  24. An excellent take on the prompt, am always super pleased to read poetry entries, and your poem honours the original ‘s style beautifully. Short, sad, cryptic and consummate – well done!

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