Apr 21 2019

Happy Easter Sunday Stealing

Happy Easter - free to use image
For those who celebrate it, happy Easter. For those who enjoy reading Easter essays from the point of view of fictional characters:
Gwendolyn’s Easter Essay
Xavier’s Easter Essay

You can find the characters here:

Sunday Stealing is a blog hop I joined earlier this year. Weekly questions to get to know each other. Fun times! My A to Z posts will resume tomorrow.

Sunday Stealing welcome mat image for blog hop
Sunday Stealing
Questions to get to know each other.

1. What Did You Have For Lunch?
On Saturday for lunch I had a bagel with honey, and a handful of walnuts.

2. Do You Dance In The Car?
If there’s a really good song.

3. Favourite Animal?
Wolf, Turkey, Turtle. Those are the ones of my tribe. I also like bears. And lobsters.

4. Do You Watch The Olympics?
I’ve seen some of it. I hear the Mongolians have a more extreme version.

5. What Time Do You Usually Go To Bed?
When I’m tired.

6. Are You Wearing Makeup Right Now?
No. I’m really not that kind of guy. (Though I’ll support the ones who are.) I suppose sometimes there’s some ceremonial face paint that might count, but that’s not today.

7. Do You Prefer To Swim In A Pool Or The Ocean?
Ocean. Why isn’t river an option?

8. What Was The Last Thing You Ate?
Walnuts.

9. Bottled Water Or Tap Water?
Again, I must ask why river isn’t an option?

10. What Makes You Happy?
Snookums. Books. Nature. Good food, good friends. Accomplishing goals. This blog hop.

11. Did You Like Swinging As A Child? Do You Still Get Excited When You See A Swing Set?
(Pauses to look at my A to Z cohost, @JRVincente — I’ve been corrupted by commenting on adult blogs. I misunderstood the use of the word swinging. 😇😈)
Yeah, so, “as a child,” well, I don’t know what age you count there. The first time I saw a swing set… Well, anyway. Yeah, it was fun. But I know children younger than me seemed to enjoy it more, so I probably missed something.

12. Do You Work Better With Or Without Music?
I write better without. My paycheck job, it’s not really optional.

13. Do You Make Your Bed In The Morning?
No.

14. Do You Like Your Music Loud?
Depends what’s playing.

15.Do You Fear Thunder / Lightning?
Not beyond reasonable precautions and respect.


Quote from Host Bev Sykes of sundaystealing.blogspot.com and the blog “Funny the World”.
Welcome to Sunday Stealing.
This feature originated and published on WTIT: The Blog. Here we will steal all types of questions from every corner of the blogosphere. Our promise to you is that we will work hard to find the most interesting and intelligent questions. (Past hosts include: Our first – Judd Corizan, Mr. L, Kwizgiver and Bud) Cheers to all of us thieves!
This week’s questions were originally from: Question Meme

~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~

Apr 20 2019

Recommend #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Recommend #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author ~ Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter R
is for Recommend

Would you recommend the book, and why or why not? Who, or what groups, do you think might enjoy it, or should avoid it? Do you know who the book was written for, who the original target audience was?

What age group is this appropriate for, and is it correctly categorized for them? (Especially with children’s books.) Would you recommend it only to others who like the genre? Or do you think this book would appeal to a wider audience?

If it is a clean-read, you might suggest it to those looking for such books. Or, if you think it would offend a certain group, you might recommend they not read it.

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Would you recommend a book using the information given, please?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
Writing Book Reviews As An Author B&N Nook Goodreads image

Apr 19 2019

Quote #AtoZChallenge Writing #BookReviews as an #Author and #IndieAuthor

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter Q
is for Quote

Is there a short quote, excerpt, or passage you especially enjoyed? Or one you especially hated? Copyright laws have a gray area on how much you can include in a review. The current rule of thumb is to keep it at under 100 words per review (often less for books under 300 pages). Check the book’s copyright page for any specific guidelines set by the publisher.

BONUS CONTENT:

Find a quote you REALLY love? Keep it short, make it a meme, and share it. Some authors are willing to do this themselves. Others are waiting and hoping for a fan to do it. “Pay it forward” by being that fan when you find something worthwhile. Share it on Pinterest, Twitter, and other such sites.

Do a search to see if others have created memes of your favorite books. (Memes are sharable images, usually with words included, passed between people online. They may be funny, culturally relevant, or just interesting.) Like and share those. Grow the online book and writing community, especially for Indie Authors!

Speaking of which… do you know it’s #IndieApril? My local writing group shared this Tweet about it:

My books are indie. Here are two memes you can share:

#quote #excerpt #book #title After reading the book, did the title make sense? Some readers enjoy finding the title inside the book. The “ah-ha” moment of figuring out where the title comes from can be very meaningful. Does the book live up to the title? Writing Book Reviews as an Author @JLenniDorner #IndieApril morning teary eyed call quote from Fractions of Existence #book by @JLenniDorner #UrbanFantasy #Novel #read #IndieApril

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Have you ever seen an intresting quote from a book on social media?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
Writing Book Reviews As An Author B&N Nook Goodreads image

Apr 18 2019

Propagate #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


hashtag free to use image

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter P
is for Propagate

Propagate! Meaning to wildly spread and promote the review you write! Don’t hide your thoughts in the shadows. Be proud that you are literate, that you were able to read and comprehend a book well enough to write a review of it. Post your review in as many places as possible. Places like your blog, Goodreads, BookBub, and various book clubs that allow it. Retail sites such as Amazon and Smashwords often allow reviews too. (Though Amazon doesn’t allow reviews during the pre-order phase.)
Amazon preorder

Putting hashtags in the title of your blog post, and in links to your review using social media, is a great way to get it noticed. Think about what might draw you in. What genre was the book you reviewed? Was it diverse? Is it a new release, or by a debut author? People are looking to read certain books. They search those hashtags looking for recommendations. You can help other readers find a book to love. It might net you a “like,” a word of thanks, or even a new follower. But keep your hashtags limited to three or four. (People tend to ignore posts with five or more.)

The more people who discover your review, the more who will read it. The more who read it, the more who will be interested in what you said. If you suggest a book that becomes someone’s favorite, they’re going to like you more. The same is true if you end up hating the same book for the same reason. You’re not only supporting the writing community, but you’re also connecting with fellow readers.

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Have you ever discovered a book because of a review or hashtag? ( #BookReview #FridayReads #Bookstagram etc)

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
Writing Book Reviews As An Author B&N Nook Goodreads image

Apr 17 2019

Occurrences #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author and #WEPFF Jewel Box


What is in your Jewel Box? Join @TheIWSG @DeniseCCovey for 2019's second challenge #WEPFF #amwriting #flashfiction

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter O
is for Occurrences

What occurrences caused you to read this book? Did something, or someone, specific motivate you? Perhaps you read a blog post, a book review, or were told about it by a friend.

How did you get a copy? Bought, borrowed from a friend, loaned from a library, Advanced Reader Copy possibly given in exchange for a review (ALWAYS mention if this is the case), found on the bus, given as a gift, etc. Sometimes the occurrences that led you to a book make a difference.

line break

JEWEL BOX PARK

by J Lenni Dorner

Peanut shells crunch under my feet. I know it’s a carnival here today, but it will be a public park again tomorrow. Who will clean this mess?

“Step right up! Knock down the bottles, win a prize. Three balls for a dollar.”

Why did I come here? What about the bright lights and annoying sounds drew me out of my cool home? It’s sweltering out. The sun is sinking, yet I swear it’s getting warmer.

“How about you? Three balls for a dollar. Easy game. A child could win.”

I shake my head at the bearded man running the game. Triple braids coated in wax make his facial hair look fantastical. Costumes and make-up never did it for me. Why am I here?

“You there, Slugger! Win a bear for the lady. Step right up. Three balls for a buck.”

Cotton candy melts on the nearest bench. On pleasant days in autumn, I sit on that bench. Will someone clean it? Does the charity carnival come with mops and buckets?

“Oh, nice try. All in the wrist, you know. Two balls to go!”

I wish the library just asked me for a check. Be so much easier, so much quieter and cleaner, to pay for their renovations.

“Another miss. One ball to go!”

I nearly fall over, my ankle turning in, as someone crashes into me. A mother yells at her child to be more careful. The child ralphs on the grass beside me. As I step backward, my ankle burns. Of course I’d be injured at the carnival outside my door! I stumble back until I hit the booth.

“Strike three, you’re out. Sorry, pal. Try again? Another dollar, another three? No? How about you?”

I glance at the prize box. There are books? One I must have. I look to the bearded man.

“Something caught your eye? Ah, not just teddy bears today. Three balls for a dollar! Knock down the milk bottles, win a book.”

I had no intention of spending any money here. Wouldn’t want to encourage this carnival, lest it becomes an annual event. But one dollar wouldn’t make much difference. The prize is worth more. I shell out the cost of the balls.

I feel the first one. My fingers run over the stitching. It’s older, fraying. The ball hasn’t been cleaned between uses. How many grubby hands have clutched this thing? I set the ball down, shaking my head.

He looks at me like I’m the one wearing a tie-dye shirt under a red and white striped vest.

I pull a packet of wet wipes out of my pocket. After cleaning the next ball, I take my place. There are three stacks of milk jugs. Only one has been placed with enough care to be even. Sloppy. I hate the look of the uneven two.

The ball soars from my hand. An ugly sound smacks my ears. I turn around, only to have my nose assaulted by the smell of vomit. Blazing heat has cooked it. I want to run home.

“Very good, very good! Take your next shot. Three balls needed for the prize you want.”

What cruel joke is this? Shouldn’t hitting the jugs with one ball be enough? I have to touch another of his unwashed things?

I take out another wipe, eyeing the bearded man as I clean. How much would I pay to throw these balls at a dunk tank target? To see his wax wash away? Oh, if only! The library would be larger than the stadium thanks to my funds. I could dunk this man as the sun goes down and repeat again and again until the rooster wakes.

He doesn’t know who I am.

Peanut shells crunch under my feet as I take a step back. My ankle stings, but I’ve had worse. Sweat teases my face. Dirty, filthy, stinky sweat. I need to bathe. The milk bottles are keeping me from a cool shower.

Another burst of sound as the ball hits. Both uneven stacks are down. My ears ring. The park spins. Too many lights! I should have stayed in.

“Well-done, well-done! Just get the third and you’ll have won.”

I stare at the bottles. There’s one that isn’t quite right. Ah, so the game is rigged. My aim needs to be more to the left. I look at the ground. A puddle of soda blocks my spot.

Too much litter! Someone sneezes. I shouldn’t have left home.

More blinding lights pop on as the sun vanishes. People cheer in the distance. Someone yells about hotdogs and beer. The park reeks of pine and popcorn.

I look at the booth. How did I not see it before? Green paint. I shouldn’t be here.

“Go on now. Throw your last one. I’ve wiped it off for you.”

Monster! The Green Monster has come to call on me once more. Does the bearded man know? As he hands me the ball, does he know who I am? Has he ridden the Green Line of the T?

I shouldn’t be here. Too dirty, too bright, too loud. Just knock them down. One more time. Then I’ll go home for good. Away from the balls, the crowds, and the vicious Green Monster of that Jewel Box park.

The sound isn’t as loud as my ball collides with the target. One milk jug teeters. It isn’t meant to go down. Food for the monster, no doubt. It knows who I am. It remembers.

But the jug falls at last.

“Here, old timer. You’ve earned your pick.” The bearded man holds up the box of books. “Unless you wanted a teddy bear?”

I shake my head and take the book. “The Fear of Fenway.” A biography about me. No one fears me anymore. They’ve forgotten who I am. I thought I bought all the copies of this blasted book already to ensure it.

WEP WEPFF critique preference

FCA: 984 words
JEWEL BOX PARK by J Lenni Dorner

Fenway is a jewel box park, and is the oldest active ballpark in Major League Baseball. The Green Monster is in Fenway. The Green Line of the T refers to Boston’s public transit, particularly the route one uses to reach Fenway Station. “The Fear of Fenway” is a non-existent book, as is the main character of this story.


#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
In the Flash Fiction story above, and in an example review in Writing Book Reviews As An Author, someone wins a book by knocking down milk jugs at a carnival.
Question: What is the most unusual or interesting reason or way you’ve ever gotten a book?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
Writing Book Reviews As An Author B&N Nook Goodreads image

UPDATE:

THE ENCOURAGEMENT AWARD FOR THE 2019 WEP APRIL CHALLENGE JEWEL BOX goes to @JLenniDorner #WEP #WEPFF

Apr 16 2019

Needs Editing #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Zeugma

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter N
is for needs editing

Was the editing done well? If not, provide up to a dozen examples of failure types, mentioning the locations in the book.

There are three good reasons to include editing information in a review.

  1. Readers want to know if a book is well-edited before they buy it. Your review can be a quality assurance.
  2. The author might notice the errors mentioned in your review and then go fix those issues. (You might also try to contact the author directly for major errors, especially historical or factual inaccuracies of which you have proof.)
  3. You might be wrong. This gives editors a reason to check. Also, you’re an author, and authors have always been the ones to craft and reshape languages. So you may spark a conversation that results in you becoming right.

Why only note up to a dozen errors? https://www.denisecowleeditorial.com/blog/why-the-grammar-police-arent-cool This article covers the reasoning. It’s a quality control check by you, a reader. The purpose isn’t to bully or belittle. Nor are you being paid to find these issues, and as such there’s no need to correct everything.

On the more positive side of editing notes:

Has the author crafted the language with a zeugma, or with a poem that changes meaning when read from bottom to top or every other line? Has the author mastered showing rather than telling, with adjectives not being used to tell readers how to feel but rather making the readers feel descriptions? (This is about language mastery and use. That falls apart if not edited properly.)

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: How important is it to you that a book be well-edited?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
Writing Book Reviews As An Author B&N Nook Goodreads image

Apr 15 2019

Might also like #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Cheese image ~ Photo by Victoria Shes on Unsplash

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter M
is for Might also like

There are some books you might recommend to others. This doesn’t mean you should put in a review, “If you like Twilight, read the Vampire Diaries!” Instead, try to phrase it like, “if you enjoy stories with a romance between a vampire and a loner teen girl, you might also like this book” or “I’d suggest this to those who enjoy alternative versions of vampire lore.”

The key here being what you liked about the story. What made it different? How does it work well in its genre? Why would you suggest it to other readers? Who, in your opinion, is the target audience for the book?

Or, on the dark side, who wouldn’t you suggest it too? Might it offend or trigger some readers? Is there a certain age group for which this isn’t suitable?

Think about cheese for a moment. In the above picture, what cheese do you think that is? Probably Parmigiano-Reggiano, right? Why? But not Brie. See, we tend to like “Parmesan” because it’s a hard and granular cheese, thereby making it good for grating onto pasta. That doesn’t mean Brie isn’t a good cheese. But not everyone is looking for a soft cheese. Pregnant people are cautioned to avoid soft cheese because of listeriosis. Apply this same thought process to books.

You might make new book-loving friends by sharing your likes and dislikes in this way. It’s not always easy to pinpoint what one likes or dislikes about a book, but it’s worth sharing if you figure it out.

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: What do you like most about your favorite book? (Or one of your favorite books, if you have more than one.)

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
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Apr 14 2019

Filling In Blanks for Sunday Stealing * #AtoZChallenge #WRiTECLUBDFW Equity and Giveaway

Sunday Stealing welcome mat image for blog hop
Sunday Stealing
Questions to get to know each other.

It’s always nice when there’s fresh coffee when you need it.

Oh, that winning story is mine.

It’s a sure sign of a good day when someone says something nice about your hard work.

Are we having an attack by spammers again??!.

My heart soared when I read a recent review.

Do you believe in equity? I am a supporter!
Equality vs Equity

I’m a Lenni-Lenape.

I was looking at shirts and commenting on A to Z posts earlier.

Drink more water when the moon is full.

When we finish with the #AtoZChallenge, it will be time to vote daily at #WRiTECLUBDFW.

Ronel is the best! (Janet is close behind.)
CommentLuv stats image

Underneath it all I love April, even if it’s exhausting.

Oh! And thanks for all the love, which is why I’m holding a contest.

~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~

And as for the weekend, tonight I’m looking forward to making more comments on blogs, tomorrow my plans include making even more comments on blogs and Sunday, I want to be a blog hop master because the #AtoZChallenge has taken over my brain!


Quote from Host Bev Sykes of sundaystealing.blogspot.com and the blog “Funny the World”.
Welcome to Sunday Stealing.
This feature originated and published on WTIT: The Blog. Here we will steal all types of questions from every corner of the blogosphere. Our promise to you is that we will work hard to find the most interesting and intelligent questions. (Past hosts include: Our first – Judd Corizan, Mr. L, Kwizgiver and Bud) Cheers to all of us thieves!
This week’s questions were originally from: Facebook

Apr 12 2019

Knockout Plot #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Knockout Plot #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter K
is for Knockout plot!

The plot is the cause and effect of the story. Because “A” happened, “B” happens and “C” might happen, and then “D” becomes an available choice. Did the book have that sort of natural plot flow? For non-fiction or reference, did the order the book was written in make sense to you as you read?

Plot #writetip Knockout Plot #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author

In a great book, you won’t notice the plot while you’re reading. Video game players have a strong understanding of plot. Level one characters do not fight the big boss. The character goes through the game, doing a sequence of events that are necessary to get to the climatic end. Gamers judge games on how well the plot works, even if they do so with a different lingo.

Explain A Film Plot Badly #ExplainAFilmPlotBadly Wizard of Oz humor
#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Have you ever searched Explain A Film Plot Badly? #ExplainAFilmPlotBadly

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
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Apr 11 2019

Jubilant #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author #BonusContent


jubilant #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author - mood alter review- Photo by Belinda Fewings on Unsplash

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter J
is for jubilant

Did your own life or mood impact how you feel about a book you’re reviewing? This is touched on briefly in the book. This post is more detailed.

BONUS content!

Assume the reader is in a terrible mood #writetip - jubilant #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author

Sometimes when reviewing, if the reviewer is in a good mood, the review becomes more positive. We turn to books to escape reality, to change our mood. There are books out there that have made readers feel better.

But sometimes a person just isn’t jubilant, and nothing will change that. Their negativity can contaminate the memory of a good book.

Emotions can influnce how a review is written. This is especially true when there’s a large gap of time between reading and reviewing the book. So first recognize and consider your emotional state before posting a book review.

  • How is your day?
  • Are you managing your mood?
  • Did you sleep okay?
  • Has a big life-event impacted you today?
  • Is anger making you want to blame someone?
  • Have you carefully considered the implications of your words?

Reviews don’t have to be perfect. And you don’t want to write a review devoid of emotion. Just take a moment for awareness of your mood. A friend of mine suggests smiling when writing. She swears it makes a difference in the words.

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Have you ever written something while in one mood, but thought differently about it later?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
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Apr 10 2019

Identify Genre #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Identify Genre #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author - Photo by S O C I A L . C U T on Unsplash

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter I
is for identify genre.

Has the book’s genre been properly identified?

(IMPORTANT NOTE: This is largely beyond the control of the author. While incorrect category listings should be identified and mentioned, it would be improper to deduct “star” ratings for that which the author could not control.) Published books often include correct categories on the copyright page.

Writing Book Reviews As An Author genre image
Has this book’s genre been properly identified? Above is a screenshot compilation from Amazon, Goodreads, and Smashwords.

Look for these:

  • Reference > Writing Skills
  • Nonfiction > Literary Criticism
  • Literature, rhetoric & criticism
  • Literary Philosophy & theory (including techniques and principles of criticism)
  • Nonfiction > Self-Help > Creativity
  • Reference > Writing, Research & Publishing Guides > Writing Skills

Okay, so why is it important to identify the genre in your review? Because some readers select books based on genre. If a reader loves horror, but a book is listed as high fantasy, that reader might not find that book. As websites become less reliable sources of determining genres, reviewers have gained importance and value. If someone wants to know the genre of the book, and your review is where they find that information, odds are they’ll give your review a “like,” “heart,” or “thumbs-up.”

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question:

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
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Apr 09 2019

Hindrance #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Hindrance #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author - Photo by Nicolas Hoizey on Unsplash

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter H
is for Hindrance

Did the important characters all have goals, something they worked toward or that gave them purpose during the story? Was it easy to tell what it was that the protagonist and antagonist wanted most, the obstacles between them and it, and what they were willing to do to get it?

Especially for non-fiction or reference, did everything in the book seem to have a purpose?

Writers usually give every named character an internal and external goal, and sometimes a few more goals along the way. Those goals can often tell you what genre you’re reading. Escape a monster? Horror. Get the love interest? Romance.

A hindrance is what makes the story worth telling. That’s why it’s important to think about when writing a book review.

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Who is your favorite book antagonist and from what novel?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
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Apr 08 2019

Genre #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Books

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter G
is for genre.

Irresistible interest within a genre is about what you, and fans of the genre, enjoy.

Think about a genre. Consider what makes a book fit into that genre. Look at the books with the most reviews in the genre and take note of about what, specific to the genre, people most often comment on. If possible, find a book review blog that focuses only on that genre, then learn how that blog rates those books.

Leaving book reviews for books in your genre gives you authority, or credit, especially among readers who share your opinion. It also encourages your fellow authors to read and review your work.

When writing a book review, ask yourself:
Would you recommend a book only to others who like the genre it’s in?
Or do you think the book would appeal to a wider audience?

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: What’s your favorite genre to read?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
Writing Book Reviews As An Author B&N Nook Goodreads image

Apr 07 2019

Sunday Stealing

Sunday Stealing welcome mat image for blog hop
Sunday Stealing
Questions to get to know each other.

1. If you could build a second house anywhere, where would it be?

Another world with “teleportation” type travel to and from.

2. What are your favorite articles of clothing?

Ones I’ve made. My deerskin pants are pretty comfortable.

3. The last CD you bought or downloaded?

Album: Almost Here By: The Academy Is…

4. What time do you generally wake up in the morning?

I like to wake up with the sun. That doesn’t always work.

5. What is your favorite kitchen appliance?

The toaster. I generally don’t mess that up.

6. If you could play an instrument, what would it be?

What’s with the assumption that I can’t play them all? (I don’t see the clarification of “well” mentioned… just saying.) I don’t know. If I was going to master an instrument, I’d probably want to invent one of my own. Drums, if I really have to pick one that exists.

7. What is your Favorite color?

Orange

  • Orange: If orange is your favorite color, you are a social person with a vibrant personality as the color represents energy, warmth, and, enthusiasm.”
  • “As people get older, they start to shun orange.
    You are: Friendly, easy going, and probably a theater major.
    Those who adore orange want to be the center of attention, tend to be flamboyant in nature, and are not likely to have too many serious thoughts. They’re friendly, and people like that — until the overdose of flamboyancy kicks in, when friends tend to run.
    According to Faber Birren, who studies color, those with a favorite color of orange are not as likely to marry, and if they do, their “marriage will be one of light affection.” Yikes.”
  • Orange. “This color of luxury and pleasure appeals to the flamboyant and fun-loving person who likes a lively social round. Orange people may be inclined to dramatize a bit, and people notice them, but they are generally good-natured and popular. They can be a little fickle and vacillating, but on the whole they try hard to be agreeable. Orange is the color of youth, strength, fearlessness, curiosity and restlessness.”
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    #bob23igphoto #boutofbooks #orange

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    8. Do you believe in the afterlife?

    Yes. That’s why I’m protective of my soul. I also think some versions of reincarnation are possible.

    9. Your Favorite children’s book?

    Twas the Night Before Christmas

    10. Can you juggle?

    🤹🏽‍♂️ – No. But juggle tasks and roles? Yup.

    11. What’s your favorite day of the week?

    Thursday

    12. Which do you prefer, sushi or hamburger?

    sushi

    13. What is your favorite flower?

    Wild violets. They’re delicious.

    14. What is your favorite meal?

    Any one I’ve caught and cooked over a fire myself.

    15. Describe your ideal weather?

    Cool autumn day.

    16. What is your favorite Ice Cream?

    Mint cookies and cream

    17. What is your favorite breakfast?

    Berries and waffles.

    18. Where did you meet your spouse or significant other?

    Oh, that’s a long and complicated story.

    Bonus: something you’d like to do that you’ve never done before?

    Hit some milestones! You can help, and maybe win!

    ~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


    Quote from Host Bev Sykes of sundaystealing.blogspot.com and the blog “Funny the World”.
    Welcome to Sunday Stealing.
    This feature originated and published on WTIT: The Blog. Here we will steal all types of questions from every corner of the blogosphere. Our promise to you is that we will work hard to find the most interesting and intelligent questions. (Past hosts include: Our first – Judd Corizan, Mr. L, Kwizgiver and Bud) Cheers to all of us thieves!
    This week’s questions were originally from: Love Me Some Surveys

Apr 06 2019

Fundamentals #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Gender fluid humor meme dad jokes

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter F
is for Fundamentals

If you referenced the book title and author’s name in your review, did you spell them correctly?

Do not assume the gender of the author. If the person didn’t use a pronoun in the “about the author” section, then you shouldn’t either. Better to call someone “the author” than to change someone’s gender. Likewise, it is better to check if an author references any sort of diversity rather than assume it.

J Lenni Dorner Google image search

Check out that image search. I’m none of the four people shown. (Three women and one guy, all who I know.) I did blog tours and guest posts, and I interview authors. A search engine like Google will bring you a bunch of images. This is one reason you can’t assume anything about an author. Use only what you know for certain to be true.

Also, when reviewing on your blog, mention the title of the book so people know what you’re reviewing. And be sure your review in other locations is for the right thing. What do I mean? This:


If you’re going to include a summary, keep it at one or two sentences and leave out any spoilers. Summaries should describe the purpose or reason for the book, and any major viewpoints asserted. It should show you know what the book questioned or defended.

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Did you learn something on my blog this week?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
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Apr 05 2019

Earn Stars #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter E
is for Earn Stars

Some reviewers believe a book must “earn” stars. Others believe all books start off with five-stars, and they deduct as they find flaws.

0 star rating image on the blog of @JLenniDorner

For some reviewers, all books start with no stars. They earn the stars as the reviewer reads. One star for a strong protagonist. Another star for excellent editing. A star for keeping the reader glued to the page. Twist endings get another star. A theme the reader loves earns yet another.

1 star rating image on the blog of @JLenniDorner

In the movie “Dangerous Minds,” the teacher says everyone has an A. Keeping the A is the challenge. This intrigues one student who says he’s never had an A before. (I’m sure there’s a name for that method of teaching, but Google has been unkind in my search.)

Some reviewers use this same method when it comes to stars. Every book starts with five stars. Based on whatever criteria matters most to that reviewer, stars get deducted.

2 star rating image on the blog of @JLenniDorner

This is one reason readers have different star ratings for books. Two reviewers could both claim to like a book, but one reviewer gives it four stars and the other gives it five. “But they both said they liked it!” Yes, but they used a different method to determine how likable they think that book is. Liked it enough not to deduct versus liked it enough to let it earn more stars.

3 star rating image on the blog of @JLenniDorner

Another reason that a book might gain a star is the “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon” game. The idea of the game is that everyone is an acquaintance of Kevin Bacon, within six degrees.

  1. I have a
  2. spouse who
  3. served a meal to an agent
  4. who represents an actor
  5. who was in a movie with another actor
  6. who was in a movie with Kevin Bacon

4 star rating image on the blog of @JLenniDorner

How is that related to book reviews? Because someone might read a book and decide it’s worth 3.5 stars. Then figure out they know the author, or know someone who knows the author. Because of this degree, they decide they like the author more, and thus decide that 3.5 should be a 4 instead of a 3. (Because the sites don’t allow half stars.)

The downside is that some sites remove reviews if they find the reviewer has a degree or two of separation from the author. On one hand, that might prevent biased reviews. On the other hand, it means the author has trouble getting reviews from the people most likely to leave them. Reviews lead to more sales. More sales means the place that sells the book makes more money. Vicious, isn’t it?

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: To which school-of-thought do you belong? Everyone starts with none has has to work to five, or every book starts with five and you deduct? Or do you flip between the two methods?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


 star rating image on the blog of @JLenniDorner

~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
Writing Book Reviews As An Author B&N Nook Goodreads image

Apr 04 2019

Devotee #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Devotee #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author Fandom Fan Ship Books

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter D
D is for — Devotee

Are you a devotee, supporter, shipper, or fan for any authors? The big-name best-sellers get a lot of support from fans. That’s great! But did you know that lesser-known writers become big-name best-sellers if enough fans support them? You can make a difference!

When writing a book review, it’s important to note how you now feel about the author. Would you read something from this author again? Are you now a supporter, or a fan, of this writer? Have you read books by this author before? If so, how did this one hold up to those?

What’s in it for you? Well, if you suggest a book that becomes someone’s favorite, they’re going to like you more. The same is true if you end up hating the same book for the same reason. You’re not only supporting the writing community, but you’re also connecting with fellow readers. #Networking!

Suppose I suggest “Cat Knot Stooges” as a great book. You read it and love it too, and for the same reasons. Will you feel closer to me? Might you wonder what else I’ve read? What if, upon searching for that information, you figure out I’ve written a book. Are you more inclined to look up that book?

That is a real scenario that actually happened to me. And the author? She had the same prior experience. It isn’t hypothetical. Book reviews really can help you make new friends and new fans. You have to drive traffic to the review first though. That’s why part of shipping an author is sharing your review. Tweet links to it. Create a pin. Put your five favorite books, ones you’ve reviewed, on a pile and #bookstagram it!

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: Why do you think readers should write book reviews?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


Find the book:
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Apr 03 2019

#IWSG Wish for Help Writing a Scene

If you could use a wish to help you write just ONE scene/chapter of your book, which one would it be?

IWSG

(Existence series book two) The first kiss of two certain characters. Because it isn’t just a kiss and they aren’t human. So I need to emphasize the importance of what’s actually happening while also balancing the emotions and making it clear that this is consensual even though one character is in over her head until after the kiss.

(Anah’s story) How to resolve a high-stakes conflict scene I’ve included. I’m thinking of turning it into a drill (like a fire drill where people practice leaving a building calmly). But there’s the aftermath of “if this REALLY happened, what would I do??” And I honestly don’t know what to tell my character, so I don’t know what to tell her parents to tell her. Because if it really happened, that’s it, the story is over. It’d suck and then she’d die. So I’m trying to create a way for a better answer to exist. First, I need to remember that it’s a “fantasy” problem only based on a real world problem. (The real world problem doesn’t have a good answer. Basically, if it happens, things suck and then you die. That’s really what happens. Like, if you’re super lucky, there’s a war and you maybe don’t die. But, ummm, the odds aren’t really in your favor.)

So, yeah.

I welcome any ideas.

How about you? Are you in the IWSG? Looking forward to reading their latest book? Did you hear they’re making another?

Apr 03 2019

Cover to cover #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author


Cover to cover #AtoZChallenge #Writing #BookReviews as an #Author ~ Book Photo by Anastasia Zhenina on Unsplash

Writing Book Reviews As An Author

Inspiration To Make It Easier

By: J Lenni Dorner

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary blogging from A to Z challenge letter C
C is for — Cover to cover

“I read this book cover to cover because ___.”

That’s what people really want to know when they read a book review. (And if you didn’t finish it, they want to know why not.) Did the book stimulate, inspire, or impress you? Or did it leave you feeling weary and disenchanted?

Maybe you finished it out of obligation. Perhaps you read it all because it was worth your time. Or maybe there was something about the book that made you put it down forever.

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary badge
Question: What gets you to read a blog post from the opening to the ending?

— J, Co-host and Team Captain #AtoZChallenge


~ GIVEAWAY! Click here. ~


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